Hyprocrisy in Politics: Criticizing Trump

A friend wrote a Facebook post outlining every action Donald Trump has taken in his first days as president and at the bottom wrote, “dictator.” The problem with such a claim is that nothing Trump did was illegal or unconstitutional. So, my question is did that person or liberals in general who are now upset with President Trump’s policies protest when Barack Obama extended the use of executive orders to by-pass Congress and legislate policies? Did they call him a dictator? Answer, no they did not.

Hyprocrisy in politics is not new, but those who delight in attacking the sitting president for every act he takes should understand what they are doing has unintended consequences that undermine their objective. If criticism is meant to lessen support, then attacking a president for his every decision is a poor way to accomplish that goal. Why? First, people weary of the constant posts all with the same message and stop paying attention. Second, the constant negative drum beat makes no distinction between issues that are minor and of import only to a few and major issues where they might actually garner support. It’s like the boy who cried wolf. If you cry wolf every day, when a real wolf appears, no one will pay attention to you.

Executive orders are extra-constitutional, and arguments can be made on both sides of the issues––that they are needed for situations when there’s no time to get Congress to act and that they grant presidents too much leeway. But they have been in use for more than a century. The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order. Congress and the courts can also interfere when presidents do go too far. For example, a federal judge a year ago rejected President Obama’s attempt to use executive privilege to deny to Congress access to documents relating to “Fast and Furious,” the policy that allowed the sale of thousands of weapons to Mexican drug gangs and Congress blocked Obama’s executive order which sought to close Guantanamo.

Sitting presidents are fair game for criticism. My advice is know your facts and hold your ammo until you see the whites of his eyes. In other words, don’t shoot just for the sake of shooting. Make sure your target is real and your remarks have a chance to make a difference.