Antifa Coops Black Lives Matter

What are the goals of Black Lives Matter? Justice? Equality? An end to police violence against Blacks? Destroying America? Up until now, the latter has not been a goal, but that may change if Antifa militants get their way.

Antifa’s tactics during the George Floyd demonstrations are designed to bring police violence down on Black Lives Matter adherents. Here’s how they do that. BLM leaders are always at the front of any crowd facing the police. They exercise their verbal rights to protest and demand changes, but are not trying to provoke violence. Antifa people stand behind the BLM crowd where they are less visible to the cameras, armed with bricks and bottles, some loaded with accelerants, which they throw over the heads of the BLM people at the police. Their goal is to provoke the police to charge into the crowd, which if it occurs can then be used by Antifa to convince BLM they will never get justice in America. It has to be torn down.

Who is Antifa? Antifa is an ideology more than an organization. The name, which derives from “anti-fascist,” is a misnomer since their tactics are those of fascists, anarchists and communists. Their goal is undermining law and order, pushing the most vulnerable in society to give up their hopes for equality and justice through democracratic institutions, to convince people that violence is justified.

Antifa takes advantage of the rage felt by young Blacks, providing them with the tools to loot and burn along with fictional arguments. They don’t point out that fewer unarmed Blacks were killed by police confrontations in 2019––nine––than whites––19. They don’t point out the rising standard of living Blacks have achieved the past three years, the lowest unemployment rate, the criminal justice reforms––all produced by the current administration. Facts would upset their lies, would defeat their aims.

Antifa is a terrorist organization. It’s social media netwrok needs to be shut down and any of its members engaging in violent activity during the protests need to be arrested and charged with terrorist activity. And BLM leaders need to explain to their followers that engaging in looting and the like is doing a disservice to George Floyd and to their movement.

Is the problem white supremacy?

If you ask protesters what justifies their anger, most will tell you what happened to George Floyd is not unique––meaning a black man being killed by a white police officer, and that if the person being arrested was white, the officer would have acted differently.

That response is both right and wrong. It’s wrong in that Officer Chauvin has an extensive record of involvement in incidents that had to be investigated for behavior outside what is required of a member of the Minnesota Police Department, some of them involving whites. So in one sense the problem was this one officer and a system that failed to remove him from the force years ago.

Yet, it’s also true that there have been too many instances of white police officers engaging in behavior that caused serious injury or death to blacks without sufficient justification. Although the number of such incidents has declined precipitously in the past four decades, any such action that cannot be justified by circumstances, such as strong belief the person being arrested has a weapon and intends to use it, is unacceptable. The question is how we deal with those incidents. Is rioting––violence against police officers, theft and property destruction appropriate or justified? I think not.

Yet some will suggest the problem is not a few “bad” cops or improper or insufficient training; rather they claim American society is structurally organized to the disadvantage of black people––that whites enjoy racial privilege and therefore America is a white supremacist society.

This accusation cannot be backed by the numbers. Any attempt to do so must run up against data that shows that status of black Americans has risen from the lows of the first half of the 20th century under the separate and unequal Jim Crow system to to full legal equality with whites. Compare the number of black doctors, lawyers, police chiefs, school superintendents and principals, college presidents, corporation executives, and media personalities, etc. with any point in the past to 2020. Compare the status of black women in America in 1965 or 1995 to the present and you’ll see extraordinary progress. Compare the number of blacks enrolled in America’s colleges to any point in the past. Are there still blacks living in poverty? Yes, but that’s true for whites and Hispanics as well. Poverty is primary a class, not a racial, problem.

So why do some people think white supremacy is a dominant characteristic of American society? The source of the accusation is a Left professorate that has fostered this notion which has been picked up by the mainstream media and the Democrat Party. Faculty at elite colleges have for the past forty years marshaled selective incidents and partial data to justify this thesis which elevates them at the expense of their students. To be a militant on campus is the highest status a black or minority professor can achieve. In fact, if one is not militant, one is suspect and in danger of not getting tenure or promoted.

Why, you may ask, has the mainstream media bought into this thesis? The media plays to a left-leaning audience as a reflection of the composition of the reporting and editing staff. To be sympathetic to the poor, discriminated against and disadvantaged, makes these people feel good about themselves. It helps them ignore the hypocrisy of their privilege as members of a part of society that holds itself above criticism. While not condoning violence, the media’s desire to blame Donald Trump for everything they perceive to be wrong with America shows they will not condemn those protesters who go too far.

And what about the Democrat Party: why have they bought into the white supremacy argument? The answer is obvious. To be the champion today of the victims of white America enables Democrat candidates to gloss over the fact that their Party has been in control of our major cities as well as the states with the highest black population for the past 70-80 years. It is their party that ought to be held responsible for any lack of progress in those communities. So if police departments aren’t getting rid of people like George Floyd’s murderer, black people ought to look to the elected officials in those cities and hold them responsible.

There are a tiny number of whites who believe they belong to a superior race––a concept that is so vapid and without merit that any thinking American should know it could only be held by a few deranged individuals. The vast majority of white Americans seek justice and equality for all Americans. To suggest otherwise requires the accuser to identify laws and/or policies that advantage one race over another.

Americans must continue to work to live up to the ideals of the founding fathers who believed all men (and women) are equal and deserved to be treated that way. We’ve come a long way, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t more to that needs our attention. Let the discussion continue so that we can all share our views and identify problems that need to be addressed, but let’s also take a moment to glory in the progress. For without recognizing success, future progress will never be enough.

 

Are Billionaires the Problem?

Tara Isabella Burton, a columnist for the Religious News Service, wants to take advantage of the coronavirus pandemic to attack the free enterprise system that produced billionaires like Bill Gates and Oprah Winfrey. (Washington Post, May 17, 2020, B4) She would blame the conditions that created the most productive economic engine the world had ever seen with the lowest unemployment in half a century for requiring assistance of billionaires in fighting the virus.

The price of the freedoms we enjoy in the U.S. Burton asserts is that one in six children grow up in poverty, schools are unequally funded, and poor adults have healthcare issues. Even without pointing out that conditions in countries that value the collective good over individual rights are much, much worse for the majority than in the U.S.––vide Russia, China, Cuba and Venezuela––Burton must ignore the positives our system has provided its citizenry in order to focus on the negatives.

She doesn’t mention that life expectancy in the U.S. has increased steadily and was at 78.87 in 2018 up EIGHT years from 1970. She doesn’t mention that poverty is never an obstacle keeping academically talented young people out of college and on a path to the middle class. She doesn’t mention that senior citizens are healthier by far than their parents’ and grandparents’ generations, or that medical care has enabled cancer patients to live many years longer than just a generation ago.

Instead Burton relies on the language of the old Left. Telling us that we “worship” individual billionaires, and that the “collective good” has been sacrificed on the myth of the bootstrapper, and that “our obsession with freedom leaves behind our most vulnerable.” She also joins the media chorus claiming social conditions and an inept federal government are responsible for making the pandemic “so dire.”

Au contraire, Ms. Burton. Measuring the country’s response to the pandemic is as useful an exercise as the models estimating how many would have died if we did nothing. There’s no standard against which we can compare how we’ve done except to say we weren’t ready, we made mistakes, and yet we rallied and we are winning the battle. A vaccine might not be available by the end of the year, yet in record time the American manufacturing community provided life-saving equipment while the scientific community paved the way to creating a vaccine faster than for any other crisis in human history.

I would venture that in no country on Planet Earth are billionaires less admired than in the U.S. where the owner of a diner, a dairy farm or a bookstore feels just as important to society as the founders of Twitter or PayPal. We accept the existence of billionaires because we know the price we would have to pay of preventing people from rising that far above their inherent individual value would be the loss of the opportunity to rise out of poverty, to be elected to high office, or follow one’s dream career be that ballet dancer, special ed teacher or sports star. It’s a price Americans are not willing to pay because we know society as a whole benefits when each of us is responsible in large part for our successes and our failures. That’s what makes us Americans.

Alert: The Democrat Party is waging war against the private sector workforce!

There’s a war being waged on America’s private sector workforce by the Democrat Party. By keeping schools closed they are making it impossible for parents to go to their jobs. By keeping businesses closed they are causing thousands of small businesses to go bankrupt costing millions jobs. But the public sector is being paid…and now they want even more money to pay the public sector workforce who of course will be happy not just to vote for Sleep Joe, but also to donate and make phone calls on his behalf.

It’s time for parents to fight back. If your schools are not going to open in the fall, you need to take over the school buildings and throw the criminals out! Hire your own teachers and send your kids to school!

Mark my words: Inflation is coming

Mark Levin recently debated Arthur Laffer, the well-known supply side economist, as to whether inflation would be an outcome of the shutdown of the American economy. Laffer didn’t think so; Levin predicted it would be a problem and he’s right. The reasons are simple to understand. In economics, price is a function of supply and demand. Gold is rare; people want it; the price is high.

Why will the American economy suffer from inflation? The answer is simple. Conditions resulting in a supply problem for many products and services are already evident.

* Meat producers are having to destroy both mature and young cattle and pigs because shutting down restaurants and institutional purchasers has depressed demand. The impact will result in higher meat prices when restaurants reopen, as it will take months before producers are able to gear up. Some farmers may go out of business as a result of the lack of a market for their livestock. That too will affect supply.

* Farmers are having to let produce go unharvested due to decreased demand, but more important in the future is likely to be a lack of labor––a function of several factors that will remain in place even after the virus restrictions are lifted. Prices of products from other countries will also go up as they will be battling the same problems we’ll be facing.

* Restaurants are being asked to reduce seating when they reopen. That will result in higher prices as food prices will be higher and restaurants will need to earn more per customer to cover expenses.

* Products sourced from China are very likely to cost more for a variety of reasons including the fact that Chinese factories will need to make up for lost sales during the pandemic.

* The U.S. is looking to move production of medical equipment and pharmaceuticals out of China back to their home countries to prevent a reoccurrence of supply problems that arose at the beginning stages of the crisis. Given the cost of labor is higher in the U.S., products for everything from hand sanitizers to ventilators to pharmaceuticals will be higher than in the past.

* All other products produced overseas, such as clothing, will be higher as a result of the impact on suppliers––some will have been bankrupt, while others will need to raise prices to catch up.

* Labor prices in the U.S. will be higher in many industries as people will be trying to catch up for lost income.

* Governments may have to raise taxes and fees to avoid reducing services.

Higher prices in some cases will be temporary, but high prices has an affect like a tidal wave. When the price of labor, products and services increase, the user of those products must also raise prices. I don’t know what percentage of manufacturing equipment is made in China or other low-wage countries, but if hammers, lithium-ion batteries and robots cost more, those costs will have to be passed along to consumers.

Complicating this is the fact that consumers impacted by the shutdown will have less money to spend. Having lower sales, sellers must raise prices to achieve the income they need to stay in business.

Get ready, folks. Inflation is on its way. Sorry, Mr. Laffer. Your curve won’t solve this problem.

 

Garbage in, garbage out

Many of you might remember the early days of computer programming when the mantra was “garbage in, garbage out.” That needs to be applied to today to computer models predicting the severity of the coronavirus. A few examples should suffice.

The authors of an op-ed in Sunday’s Washington Post admit as much when they quote Anthony Fauci saying “Models are as good as the assumptions you put into them” at the end of an article in which they expose how sketchy the assumptions are that have been put into such models as the one out of University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation that Fauci and others have been relying on.

One of the factors that is not included in any of these models that viruses mutate. A study from China (which of course would need to be replicated) found thirty strains of the virus that causes COVID-19. The author writes, “Sars-CoV-2 has acquired mutations capable of substantially changing its pathogenicity.” The implication of that finding is that the reason some people who are otherwise healthy get very sick and die while others are asymptomatic might be that the strain they came in contact with might be more virulent.

The models are being used today to justify extreme social distancing including shutting of all but “essential” businesses in most states. Suggestions that some states and counties can ease these restrictions have been met with outcries, claiming to do so invites more deaths. The problem with that assertion is that unless one knows FOR CERTAIN the number of people who have been infected by the virus the fear of tens of thousands of additional deaths is not backed by fact.

Some recent evidence suggests more people have had the virus that previously known, including people who had mild cases or who are asymptomatic. But the bottom line is we don’t have sufficient answers to make clear-cut policy decisions. As a result, governors and other elected officials are playing safe––not wanting to be blamed for causing deaths.

Unfortunately, there is a price to pay for being overly cautious in terms of millions of people’s livelihoods. The longer the country is shut down the harder it will be to get back up and the longer it will take. The exact price also cannot be calculated because we don’t have those answers either.

We do know there is a limit to how long the federal government can print money and distribute it to everyone in the country. One factor is that the debt even at zero interest will have been repaid. Another more immediate factor is that printing more money could result in rapid inflation––which coupled with scarcity of certain goods will have its own social cost.

My advice to governors is not to take the entire burden on yourself. With the assistance of your legislature and executive agency personnel, set broad guidelines for when certain types of businesses can reopen in each county of your state. That way when deaths occur you can deflect the blame and justify the policy. Some states are facing bankruptcy. It’s time to fight that war as well as the one brought about by the virus.

Media Negativity Leads to Despair, Violence

The Biden (formerly Washington; formerly Amazon) Post featured recently a story about teenage girls who have become global warming warriors. Motivated to save the planet, they dress in black (for mourning), take off school to demonstrate at the Capitol, and should be put on suicide watch if Donald Trump wins re-election.

This is an example of the news media’s chickens coming home to lay fool’s gold eggs. The girls are parroting what the media has been selling for years––not just that we’re facing an uninhabitable planet in ten or twelve years, but also that corporations, Republicans and white males are responsible for the impending catastrophe.

The Post clues us in: Maddie “can’t remember a time when the news wasn’t full of burning forests, melting glaciers and hurricane-lashed cities.” The Post even connects the coronavirus to Maddie’s angst: “The pandemic has shut down Maddie’s life and offered a taste of the global turmoil that scientists say climate change will bring.” Attributing wild claims to science is the kind of unfounded, politically-motivated indoctrination that leads young people like Maddie to think they personally have to save the world.

Girls like Maddie take their lead from a 17-year old Swedish media star and a first-term congresswoman graduate of a university that gives out M.A.’s in economics like McDonalds gives out big macs––to any and all takers.

A consequence of the media’s symphony of negativity is that millions believe African-Americans, Hispanics and women have it worse off today than fifty years ago, and that socialism is a viable economic model. It is also responsible for the rising suicide rate among young people––especially young white males. The media also deserves some responsibility for acts of personal violence, such as the shooting of Congressman Scalise and mugging of U.S. Senator Rand Paul.

While threats to infect the president with the coronavirus by elected officials are taken down quickly, the poster is not punished and the media forwards the message suggesting a ticket to fame awaits she who would undertake that mission.

The Biden Post and New York We Fit the News to Our Narrative Times may argue they only report the news and hide behind claims of objectivity, but those bromides have been shown to hold less water than a social distancing face mask. The location of stories in each edition, the wording of the headlines, and the perspective taken all color a story’s impact. Further, the impact of coverage of a topic cannot be judged on one story. Rather it is the cacophony of stories on a topic that infiltrate a reader’s consciousness leading her to decide, as in the case of the Post’s subject, that she has no choice but to give up planning for the future in order to save the world today.

When her parents try to reason with Maddie, she replies “But it’s zero hour. Two minutes to midnight.”

I doubt that the media that now promotes these teenager warriors will be around when they discover planet Earth is doing fine without them, but meanwhile Maddie expresses fear and others no doubt feel anger and consider violence. But that too will be reported as if someone else is responsible.

What’s needed in the State of Maryland to get back to normal?

The coronavirus crisis has hit Maryland hard like it has other states––no, not the number of cases which totals only 8,225 as of April 12 or deaths which number only 235, but in terms of the shutdown of the economy. The pain Marylanders feel is in the number of people out of work (more than 125,000 have applied for unemployment), the number of businesses whose existence is threatened and the closure of schools, parks and other public facilities.

Any death due to the illness is sad and unfortunate, but Maryland is not a hot spot and is unlikely to become one. The state’s number of new cases started to decline this past week and only 1,709 people are currently hospitalized due to the virus. The disease is not overly taxing Maryland’s healthcare system.

Assuming the numbers will continue to decline, it is incumbent on state, city and county officials to begin to put in place concrete plans to remove restrictions and allow people to begin to resume normal activities while still exercising caution and common sense.

I’m calling for the governor to set up a bi-partisan body of public officials to put in place guidelines for when restrictions can be lifted. Right now only businesses designated as essential may remain open and these must enforce distancing and other safety measures.

What would resumption recommendations look like? Here’s an example: When the number of new cases in a county drop below 60 for two or three days in a row, there should be a list of businesses that are allowed to re-open. Then when the number drops below 40 a day in that jurisdiction, the list should include other businesses that can re-open. For example, retail establishments where the same safety measures employed now by pharmacies and grocery stores would apply might fall into the first camp. The first list might also include dentists who were forced to close under the assumption their masks would be needed. Restaurants, hair salons and the like might be allowed to reopen after the second milestone is reached.

When number of new cases in a county drops below 25 a day, public parks, golf courses, basketball courts and other sports settings should be allowed to re-open and education officials should be strongly advised to resume normal school activities.

Fourteen Maryland counties have had fewer than 100 cases. All social restrictions should be removed in those counties immediately.

Until a vaccine is developed and distributed widely, it is likely we will continue to see coronavirus cases resulting in hospitalizations and death. There has to be a point, however, when we as a society determine the fear of the disease should not result in the destruction of our economy. Each year tens of thousands of people die from the flu in the U.S. We don’t ask our public officials to restrict our behavior as a result of the flu. We recommend that people get flu shots and act intelligently when ill.

The president has stated that the cure should not be worse than the disease. For Maryland that means public officials need to act now to enable residents to resume normal activities sooner rather than later.

 

Why reporters don’t report contrary data

What should a national newspaper do when there is credible information that doesn’t fit their narrative? They should report that info. Right?! What did the Amazon Post do when publishing, “Trump relies on impulse in push for unproven drug” in today’s issue? They complete ignored conflicting data.

The goal of the article was to blast Trump for going against science. That meant the reporters needed to find a bunch of “experts” saying that there’s no scientific data supporting the use of hydroxychloroquine to combat covid-19. The problem is that there is credible evidence that this drug which has been used to prevent and treat malaria and to treat lupus sufferers can be effective in reducing the severity of covid-19.

Dr. Mehmet Oz reported Monday on the Sean Hannity radio show at 4:00 p.m. EST and again on his TV show that data from a French study moves this drug off the anecdotal status. Here’s what he said on his own show:

“. . . the word ‘anecdote’ is used a lot — that is an incorrect description of where this medication is now. There’s no question it’s not proven to be beneficial in the large clinical trials we expect in America, and certainly the FDA and medical societies would desire. But these have been supported with case studies. I just got off the phone with Didier Raoult, who’s the well-respected French physician who’s done a lot of this work. Thousand series of patients — 1,000 patients in a row he’s treated, and he’s not published yet, he’s going to be published over the next two weeks. But he’s got seven people who have died, they were all older and had other co-morbidities, 20 people have gone to the ICU of that trial. Now, it’s not a randomized trial, but that’s not anecdotal. The data from China we discussed last week for the first time on Fox & Friends also, pretty evident that it’s a randomized trial. That is the opposite, if I had to create an opposite of an anecdote. So when those words get thrown around and I saw us this morning in some of the papers, it’s an error on the part of journalists.”

Not only is there evidence hydroxychloroquine helps covid-19 patients, there also strong evidence that those who are taking it will not contract the virus. Dr. Oz reported that one of the top rheumatoid arthritis doctors in the country reported that none of his 1500 patients have come down with covid-19. A larger study is being done to verify that no one in the country who has been taking the drug for lupus has come down with the virus.

Why didn’t the Amazon Post report those facts? If you press them they’ll probably say the relied on their own experts or some such garbage. The truth is that they weren’t looking for evidence that conflicted with their thesis.

P.S.: What’s wrong with mainstream journalism today? The reporters are sent into the field with a thesis to prove rather than to seek all the news that’s fit to print.

The Media’s War Against Israel: A Review

Stephen Karetzky and Peter E. Goldman, eds., The Media’s War Against Israel (Steimatzky, 1986)

It can be hard in the midst of an international political crisis to evaluate the media’s coverage. Events are happening haphazardly. Reporters are playing catch-up. Opinions may reflect partial information . . . which is why when time goes by it’s desirable to reflect on the media’s job, and to give it a score.

The authors of The Media’s War Against Israel published in 1986 had the benefit of four years after the events being discussed––i.e., Israel’s conflict with the PLO as it impacted neighboring countries. Stephen Karetzky and Peter Goldman took advantage of the time to assemble opinion pieces from several sources to complement Karetzky’s focused analysis of the New York Times and Peter Goodman’s “lessons learned” piece. Their conclusion is an indictment, as the title clearly states. The media didn’t just do a poor job; it engaged in a biased attack on Israel’s role in the events.

What events are we talking about? The primary issue was Israel’s foray in the summer of 1982 into Lebanon to root out the PLO, which had, with the help of the Soviet Union, amassed a huge arsenal of weapons with the intent of stepping up the guerilla war it had been waging against Israel. Complicating the events of that summer was the morass that was Lebanon at that time.

Created in 1943, Lebanon was weakened from the start by being divided almost equally between Christian Maronite and Muslim populations. Adding to that division was the conflict between Shia and Sunni Muslims, but the primary disruptor of peace and tranquility was incursion in 1975 into southern Lebanon of the Palestinian Liberation Organization.

That mixture erupted in a 7-year civil war, which among other consequences allowed Syria to insert its forces into Lebanon. The result was anarchy, lawlessness and thousands of casualties, a story largely unreported in the Western media. What got Israel involved?

Tired of incursions into Israel by the PLO, the Israeli government allied itself with the Phalangists––a Christian Maronite group––and invaded southern Lebanon in June 1982 with the goal of driving the PLO out of the country.

Israel’s goal was accomplished in four months. The PLO was dispersed after suffering heavy casualties. The PLO, however, won the public relations war by exploiting the Western media’s lack of understanding of the conflicts in the region. The coup de grace was the PLO’s blaming Israel for the massacre of residents of the Sabra and Shatila Palestinian refugee communities by the Phalangists. (The media called these locations “camps,” but they were not tent cities. They were large communities replete with permanent housing and other structures.)

Let’s look at how the media covered these events. In the first paragraph of the foreword to The Media’s War Against Israel, Rael Jean Isaac writes “In reporting the war in Lebanon, the media behaved like a lynch mob, with print and TV reporters, columnists and cartoonists vying with each other in misstatement and calumny.”

Each piece in the book backs up Isaac’s assertion. Stephen Karetzky­––one of the editors––focused his analysis on three months of reporting by the New York Times prior to the war, detailing an anti-Israel bias even before the events of the summer took place. The book also reprints pieces published elsewhere:

  • Norman Podhoretz analyzes the media’s response in general to Israel’s foray into Lebanon.
  • Frank Gervasi adds insights from his first-hand visit to the region.
  • Ze’ev Chaftets examines the problems the Beirut press corps faced trying to provide unbiased reportage.
  • Rael Isaacs singles out Time Magazine’s adversarial approach to Israel, and
  • Edward Alexander dissects NBC’s antagonistic coverage.

A few of the most flagrant examples of bias are worth repeating

  • After his election as prime minister Time Magazine informed its readers that Menachen Begin’s last name “rhymes with Fagin”––the name of the villain of Dickens’ novel Oliver Twist.
  • Time Magazine totally made up a story claiming Ariel Sharon urged the Phalangists to attack Sabra and Shatila, and then refused to disavow the story when the author was proven to have lied.
  • President Reagan berated Prime Minister Begin personally when the caption to a UPI photo claimed a seven-month old child had been severely burned and lost both arms as a result of an Israeli bomb dropped on civilian housing. It turned out the child had not lost either arm nor had she suffered any burns, and her slight injuries were the result of a PLO shell.
  • NBC accepted the Red Crescent’s claim of 10,000 people slaughtered by Israel and 600,000 made homeless. The Red Crescent was hardly an objective organization, however, as it was run by Yasser Arafat’s brother. By the way, the Red Crescent’s homeless number exceeded the region’s total population.
  • Before investigating the cause, CBS accused Israel of intentionally killing two of its cameramen. After investigating it turned out the men were in a combat area and the tank that fired the missile was over a mile away.

Perhaps the most telling aspect of this entire affair, however, is the PLO’s success at neutering the foreign press corps that was stationed in Beirut. The PLO had asserted the authority to determine who would be allowed to report from Beirut and evidence suggests they were responsible for the deaths of eight journalists and explosions that put two independent Lebanese newspapers out of business. Worse, however, was the fact that some of the foreign press corps was decidedly pro-Palestinian and didn’t have to be persuaded to present the PLO as the victims of Israel’s aggression.

Several of the authors in this compendium touch on the subject of why the press corps was hostile to Israel. They point to the impact of the war in Vietnam on the Western media, after which the general narrative of international affairs presented the view that the U.S. and its allies were the oppressors and third world countries its victims. They also point out the practice of the TV networks showing selective footage that backed a biased interpretation of events.

Israel became the “fall guy” for the Western media’s new worldview. It had been viewed positively from 1948 until 1967 when it defeated Soviet backed Egypt and Syria as well as Jordan, which was fooled into joining the battle. After ’67, the media started labeling the PLO as protesters and demonstrators rather than terrorists despite the fact that they were engaged in acts of war against Israel.

The media also bought the PLO’s lie that they represented the oppressed residents the West Bank despite the fact the organization had been formed in 1964 when the West Bank was under Jordan’s control. As The Media’s War Against Israel conclusively documents, the media’s distorted coverage of the Lebanese war was just another sordid chapter in their failure to understand when they were being used and when the information they were being given was propaganda.

A feature of the media’s coverage during this period that deserves attention is the use of Holocaust imagery and terminology to criticize Israel’s role in these events. Both “genocide” and “holocaust” accompanied inflated casualty reports along with quotes from willing European critics such as Mitterrand, Papandreou and Kreisky. China and the Soviet Union both resorted to comparing Israel’s actions to Nazi Germany with regard to Shatila and Sabra, helping to cover up the fact that the USSR had been the primary source of weaponizing the PLO.

The use of Holocaust imagery against Israel is a particularly vile practice. It’s a low blow, akin using the word savage when describing the actions of a Native American or excusing a woman’s behavior due to her menstrual cycle.

Exposure of the media’s biased coverage of Zionism and Israel has been thoroughly documented in other studies. (See my review of Jerold Auerbach’s Print to Fit.) The excuse that coverage of the Holocaust was weak due to the media’s inability to confirm accusations or that a hesitancy to support the formation of a Jewish state by the New York Times was understandable as it threatened the assimilationist aims of some members of the American Jewish community fails to stand up when the record of The Times and other media falls short of their claims of objectivity and impartiality decade after decade. Sadly, biased reporting when contrary views are confined to small opinion journals sways public opinion.

One might ask why should we care about the media’s failures from more than thirty years ago. As one media critic points out in the book, the American people of the 1980s placed a lot of trust in the media. After the deluge of anti-Israeli stories and commentary by The Times, Time, Newsweek, the Networks, polls showed a marked decline in support for Israel. That might explain why some people in the 21st century are prone accept such lies as Israel is an apartheid state and intentionally kills civilians.